Garde d'enfants à domicile en anglais

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23 juin 2017

Living in France

PREPARING YOUR STAY – BEFORE ARRIVAL

In order to work for Le Repertoire de Gaspard, you either need a student visa, long stay visa or a working permit. Please note this only applies to NON EU citizens and we advise you to always make sure to check out the rules with your local consulate as there can be variations.

What is the difference between a work permit and a visa?

A work permit is permission for a company to employ a foreign worker, whereas a visa is a leave for the candidate to stay in the country.

Generally if you want to work in France, obtaining a long stay visa or a student visa is the easiest option. Once you have the long stay visa you then need to apply for a residence permit (carte de séjour) in the prefecture where you plan to live when you arrive in France.

The residence permit can be valid for 6 months to a year, and can be renewed. To obtain a visa you need to submit a file to the consulate of France in your home country with everything properly translated to French.

Application for a student visa

Visas can only be applied for at the French Embassy of the non-EU national\'s home country before departure.

Documents required

• You need to use a long term visa form for your student visa application.

• Passport signed and valid for a period of three months beyond the applicant\'s last day of stay in France.

• The visa application forms signed and legibly filled out (consult your consulate for the number of copies received, and do note that you cannot make a copy of your application. Each application received must be filled out individually).

Please print in black. Indicate your phone numbers and e-mail. Indicate the dates of stay.

• A passport size photograph glued on each form. (Always have extra photos on hand just in case).

• Prepaid self-addressed envelope if you apply by mail. Only Express mail, Priority mail, certified mail (a registered mail) will be accepted, if not the personal appearance will be required. Note that the personal appearance is the basic rule. (Assume you will need to make a personal appearance!)

• \"Student\" visa fee: payment by credit card (Visa, Mastercard) (especially for files sent by mail) or money-order made out to \"Consulate general of France\" or certified checks. Cash is accepted only if you apply in person. Do not assume you can pay by check.

Once you arrive in France, you then need to complete further documentation with your French school or university – you may have to go for a medical check-up – ask in advance. Then you need to contact the \"Prefecture de police\" in order to obtain a student residency card (carte de sejour) and present there the visa, the original documents previously required for the visa, a birth certificate and the medical results.

NON EU CITIZENS - Application for carte de sejour/titre de sejour for

If you stay in France for over three months and you are not an EU citizen you will need a ‘titre de sejour residency’ permit (also known as a carte de sejour). Here\'s how.

Once in France, foreigners over 18 years of age who hold a valid visa may apply for residency. Application should be made within two months of arrival in the country at the ‘Service des étrangers’ section of the local Préfecture, Sous-Préfecture (or the Préfecture de Police if in Paris). Documents required for the application include :

We recommend that you bring the original document and two photocopies of each item.

• Valid passport

• Valid long stay visa (which is in the passport)

• Proof of family situation (birth certificate, marriage certificate, birth certificates of dependent children)

• Proof of employment (statement from the employer), or proof of registered self-employment

• Proof of permanent address in France (EDF electricity bill or the house deed of sale (acte de vente) for a house bought in France or a signed lease agreement for the French address)

• Recent medical certificate issued by OFII (Office Français de l\'Immigration et de l\'Intégration, formerly ANAEM, Agence Nationale d\'Accueil des Etrangers et des Migrations)

• Three recent identity photographs (there are photo booths in most shopping centres and Prefectures)

• EU-citizens moving to France with no income from employment (such as students) have the right to live in France, but need to show they have the financial resources to be self-supporting and not depend on the French state.

• Students must be enrolled in an educational institution or vocational training and have proof from a French bank of sufficient monthly revenue to support themselves and dependent family members.

• Students from the European union have the right to work in France after the end of their studies, but must obtain a provisional work permit. Other foreign students must ask for a provisional work permit.

• Students from the EU/EEA countries do not need to subscribe to the French Social Security System as they remain covered by their home country during their stay in France - check with your home social services or educational institution. If your country does not have an agreement with France and you are staying for more than three months, you should subscribe to the Social Security System.

Work permit

The foreign worker must obtain a contract draft from a French or a foreign company in France. The employer in France files an application with the appropriate administration for approval, then a visa can be issued by a consulate of France. For a short-stay work visa (up to three months) the employer in France should provide the future employee with a contract which has been countersigned by the DDTEFP (Direction départementale du travail, de l\'emploi et de la formation professionnelle). Then the future employee should apply for a short stay visa if needed. This visa is valid up to 3 months, and the residency card is not required. The applicant must provide:

• A passport valid for a period of at least three months Please make sure your passport has a blank page to affix the visa.

• Two short-stay visa application forms completely and legibly filled out. Print in black.

• Phone numbers and e-mail.

• Passport size photographs glued on each form.

• A proof of travel health/accident insurance with worldwide coverage (+ 1 copy).

• Prepaid self-adressed envelope if you apply by mail. Only Express mail, Priority mail, certified mail (registered mail) will be accepted, if not the personal appearance will be required. Note that the personal appearance is the basic rule.

• Processing fee: payment by credit card (Visa, Mastercard) (especially for files sent by mail) or money-order made out to \"Consulate general of France\" or certified checks. Cash is accepted only if you apply in person. Checks are rarely accepted at consulates.

New VLS-TS visa (stand for extended-stay visas with residency permit¬) This visa applies to all international students wishing to enroll in a French institution of higher education. In most cases, the extended-stay visas with residency permit (VLS-TS) is valid for 1 year. When the VLS-TS visa is issued, the consulate will give the applicant an official form (with instructions) that the applicant must present to the French office of immigration and integration (OFII).

Holders of the VLS-TS visa no longer have to obtain a residency permit from the prefecture having jurisdiction over their place of residence in France, but they do have to report to the OFII and complete several administrative formalities.

Specifically, a VLS-TS holder must, upon arriving in France, send to the OFII by registered mail (return receipt requested):

• The official form received from their consulate that issued the visa.

• A copy of passport pages showing the visa holders identity and the stamp indicating entry into France.

• Upon receipt of these documents, the local office of the OFII will send the visa holder, by regular mail to the address provided by the visa holder), a letter acknowledging receipt of the form and possibly asking the holder to report for a medical examination if such an examination was not performed in the holder\'s country of origin or upon entering France.

Special cases:

1. Students residing in Paris must bring the above documents to the OFII. During the months of September, October, and November, students may use the OFII office at the Cité Internationale Universitaire de Paris (CIUP). At other times of the year, they must bring the documents to OFII’s Paris headquarters.

2. Some institutions (including many of France’s universities) have entered into agreements with OFII. Where such an agreement exists, the student must submit the above documents to the institution’s international student office. Students are strongly advised to learn, before arriving in France, whether an agreement exists between their host institution and OFII.

In all cases, a tax of €58 must be paid by purchasing a tax stamp marked \"OMI\" or \"ANAEM.\" Please note this fee was correct at the time of publishing.

The stamp may be purchased:

• online at www.timbresofii.fr

• in certain shops that sell tobacco products (Tabacs)

• at tax offices.

Additional help – CampusFrance : www.campusfrance.org

• Campus France is an online portal run by the French government that helps students with their university applications, from selecting the right institution for them to guiding them through the visa process. They also review students’ applications for completeness, authenticate diplomas, and arrange interviews to explore the prospective student’s study plans.

• CampusFrance local offices make arrangements for language-proficiency tests where these are required.

• Prospective students who create an account on the CampusFrance website in their home country can access a virtual procedure that allows them to submit online applications to approximately 230 French institutions and to talk to CampusFrance staff in their country and with participating institutions from which they may obtain a preliminary offer of admission (often under the preliminary admission process known as DAP).

• Students interested in nonparticipating institutions must contact them directly.

Lodgement

Finding accommodation in Paris can be difficult if you have no contacts. Here at Le Repertoire de Gaspard, we try to put employees searching for a place to live in touch with one another via our social media networks. Some useful starting points in your search include the following sites:

www.parisetudiant.com

www.capcampus.com

www.centralparisrentals.com

www.seloger.com

www.acheterlouer.com

www.etudiantdeparis.fr

www.mapiaule.com

www.pap.fr

www.parisattitude.com

If you don’t want to live on your own, you could consider collocation. That means, sharing with another person who fits in with your lifestyle. This can be good if you want to find a French person to live with in order to improve your language skills. You can find someone to match your requirement by choosing aspects such as age, gender, whether they smoke or not etc. The websites below can help you to find a ‘coloc!’

www.colocationfrance.fr

www.colocation.fr

www.recherche-colocation.com

www.easycoloc.com

www.appartager.com

If you really want to immerse yourself in the French language by living with fellow Frenchmen and women, then you could consider living in a Foyer – French halls of residence. However, bear in mind that the French University system may not be the same as your home country.

The Association pour le développement du logement étudiant (association for the development of student accommodation) website. It contains all sorts of practical advice for finding accommodation, the list of halls of residence in Paris and is a mine of information: www.adele.org

Otherwise, to save on rent you could live with an elderly person in return for helping them out with some basic tasks. See below for ideas:

www.aidologement.com

www.concordalogis.com

www.logementintergeneration.org

www.leparisolidaire.com

You also have an option of living in a residence if you do not fancy the idea of living in an apartment in Paris. There are lots to choose from. L’Association pour le logement des jeunes travailleurs (ALJT) will give you list of residences in the Paris. Check out www.aljit.com for more information. Otherwise, there are websites aimed at helping you find a room in a private residence:

www.laureades.com

www.estudines.com

www.fac-habitat.com

www.leclubetudiant.com

www.cnous.fr

Failing that, the following Anglophone sites are always a good point of referral:

• FUSAC – www.fusac.fr

• Craigslist Paris – www.craigslist.fr

• American Church – www.acparis.org

SOCIAL SECURITY

As the French social security system is highly complicated and changes regularly, we cannot give complete and comprehensive details here. However, we provide an overview with the most relevant information for foreigners coming to France. Working in France can be a daunting prospect for foreigners in terms of the paperwork you need to complete. That is why we try to make this easier for you by applying for your social security number on your behalf. We will also register your details with URSSAF – Unions de Recouvrement des Cotisations de Sécurité Sociale et d\'Allocations Familiales, meaning the Organizations for the payment of social security and family benefit contributions. Health care: All legal residents in France are entitled to benefit from the French health care system. The way it works is you pay for the treatment and then ask for a reimbursement. You are given back a percentage of the amount, depending on the type of treatment (ranging from 100% for emergency treatment down to 65% for a course of antibiotics).

Daily allowances: Employed people (that have been contributing to the social security system) usually receive 50% of their average gross daily pay over previous three months when they are ill. This starts from the fourth day of their absence from work. Usually, employers continue to pay all or part of salary and directly receive refunds for the daily allowance from social security.

NOTE:

EU/EEA citizens are usually covered in France by their home country\'s systems. If you are going to be resident in France, you should register in the social security system. Non-EU/EEA citizens must have a residency permit to be eligible for social security coverage in France.

Those who are resident in France need to be registered with the French social security system so that they can be sure of the benefits to which they are entitled. There are several different categories of the social security system and you need to be sure that you are in the right one. The general scheme (régime générale) covers more than 80% of people in France and is the one used for employees. We focus on the general scheme only, as this which covers workers for sickness benefits, maternity benefits, accidents at work, disability, old age pensions (not relevant to you yet!), death benefits and unemployment benefits.

Once we process the application, you will receive a letter from the social security office asking for particular documents e.g. your birth certificate/ marriage certificate if relevant. You will be expected to provide these documents in French as well – we can send you a list of translators to help you out. When you have registered at your local CPAM office, you will receive a registration card (Carte Vitale), which looks like a credit card and contains a smart chip (puce). The card has your name and your social security number (No. d\'Immatriculation de l\'Assuré) printed on the front. (Social security numbers are issued by l\'Institut National de la Statistique et des Études Economiques/INSEE.) Additional information is coded into the chip, which is needed to process any claims for reimbursement or services

If you stay in France for over three months and you are not an EU citizen you will also need a ‘titre de sejour residency’ permit (also known as a carte de sejour). Here\'s how.

Application for residence permit (Carte de Séjour)

• Once in France, foreigners over 18 years of age who hold a valid visa may apply for residency. Application should be made within two months of arrival in the country at the ‘Service des étrangers’ section of the local Préfecture, Sous-Préfecture (or the Préfecture de Police if in Paris).

• The application should be made in person.

• Non-EU citizens planning a move to France should consult the French Embassy in their place of residence before departing their country.

• Non-EU individuals and families intending to move to France must apply for a long stay visa (visa long séjour) prior to leaving their home country.

• New EU Accession countries: Citizens of the new EU member states Bulgaria and Romania may live in France but there are limitations on the sectors in which they may be employed. Seek advice of the French Embassy in the new member state. We recommend that you bring the original document and two photocopies of each item. • Valid passport • Valid long stay visa (which is in the passport)

• Proof of family situation (birth certificate, marriage certificate, birth certificates of dependent children)

• Proof of employment (statement from the employer), or proof of registered self-employment

• Proof of permanent address in France (EDF electricity bill or the house deed of sale (acte de vente) for a house bought in France or a signed lease agreement for the French address)

• Recent medical certificate issued by OFII (Office Français de l\'Immigration et de l\'Intégration, formerly ANAEM, Agence Nationale d\'Accueil des Etrangers et des Migrations)

• Three recent identity photographs (there are photo booths in most shopping centres and Prefectures) d- cours de français FREE FRENCH LESSONS At Le Repertoire de Gaspard all employees have the chance to take FREE French lessons a tour office near the Champs Elysses. The two-weekly lessons are run by our qualified in-house French teacher and are aimed at helping beginners and intermediate level students to speak French with confidence and are tailored to help people on their job. By the end you should know how to handle any emergency should you run into a situation like this, how to converse with the colloquialisms French children use and ofcourse French for everyday life in Paris!

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Ils parlent le mieux de Gaspard….

April (Ecosse – baby-sitter de Nathan) : Working with the Répertoire de Gaspard has been great. I have felt very supported by them and they have really worked to find jobs that suit with my availability. The families have been nice and it's always been fun working...

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Le Répertoire de Gaspard est une agence parisienne spécialisée dans la garde d'enfant à domicile en anglais. Créée en 2006, cette structure de services à la personne propose des intervenants anglophones (nannies, baby-sitters ou professeurs d'anglais) pour la garde d'enfants de 0 à 15 ans sur Paris et l'Ile-de-France. Une méthode ludique et efficace pour apprendre l'anglais en s'amusant. Agence agréée par la Préfecture de Paris : N/130711/F/075/Q/135.